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Long time no see!
#1
Hi everyone,



I'm writing to tell I'm alive and well, although work has been hogging all my free time. I barely have time to even see my friends during the weekends!



I have small free time frames between one task and another and I'm thinking I might record single tracks during these, albeit I'm not sure how this is going to turn out.



I'll try recording new tracks from time to time and release them when I have an entire game covered.



Stay tuned and thanks for your patience!
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#2
Let me know if there's anything I can do to help to ease the burden, like any post-processing.
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#3
Welcome back! Smile







Even single tracks are nice too! I guess if I was to record / remaster video game music I'd probably only pick out certain tracks. Though having the complete collection is awesome too.
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#4
I have to admit that I'd love someone doing the quality check.

It's a long and incredibly boring job to listen accurately to all the tracks looking for hiccups, pops or clicks or unwanted noise.

I'll think about this and eventually I'll make an announcement where I'll ask for someone to help me doing the QC.
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#5
I'm trying to get back into this project too. I've been upgrading my equipment recently so I've got a much better audio recording setup but I've found that the audio input on my laptop creates a loud distortion when the audio goes silent. This doesn't occur when the exact same audio feed (using the same cables) is sent to my amplifier or other sound system which makes me think my audio chip is rubbish, and being a laptop isn't easy to replace.

I've got an external method on its way.



However I'll be diving in a little more, I'm running out of Amiga titles I own, and those floppy discs aren't any cheaper.

I am also looking at getting a SNES, so I'll keep things up to date with that.



Still have N64, SMS, NES etc I could do. And MD.
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#6
I definitely recommend you use an audio interface over your laptop line-in if you want the recordings to be good
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#7
I like the idea of forking the project into an 8-bit Audiophile Project covering NES and SMS.

The NES has HUGE popularity, I'm sure people would appreciate it.



We can use this website and forum to host it. I could actually change the project name into something like "VGMAudiophileProject" and create two subdomains, 16bit.VGMblabla and 8bit.VGMblabla



I second dogman's suggestion: there are incredibly cheap audio interfaces available on the market. You could score a very good one if you look into the second hand market.



Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 comes to mind, along with iTrack Solo if you plan on recording mono material from NES.



Behringer UCA202 is also pretty good and dirt cheap.



Oh btw, you should try to make work the one I sent you as it's pretty good! Wink

iirc you just needed a Firewire adapter and a suitable power adapter.
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#8
Bunch of random points:

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I've actually been entertaining the idea of making my own recordings... I have an Mbox Pro I can use to record. The problem is getting the console output themselves to be exactly the way I'd want them to be (eg. with the best model, + any mods I'd have to do to eliminate unwanted noise and other such things). Plus the money I'd have to spend... I simply don't have much to spend wildly on this kind of thing.

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IIRC for NES the audio-out has a loud buzzing because of a sub-par mix stage. Iron Goat's recordings of NES ( http://forums.ffshrine.org/f72/iron-goats-console-audio-soundtracks-master-list-174131/ ) are super clean because he records the output directly from the 2A03 chip. If you have a way to do that, that would be best. Also worth noting that emulation of the extra chips some games use for extra channels aren't quite up to snuff as the normal NES audio emulation is (Famicom Disk System games, VRC6/7, etc.); would be great to somehow get recordings of that.

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N64 would be good just because the USF rips out there have many problems, versus any kind of auditory benefit (tempo often being wrong, pitch being wrong, songs getting clipped off at the beginning etc.). However, getting the full soundtrack out of complex games with no sound test like Donkey Kong 64 seems impossible to me; I can't see how it can be done without extensive hacking knowledge. Plus these have interactive engines for the audio that changes instruments and such on the fly as you go to different areas of the game (Banjo-Kazooie; Hyrule Field in Ocarina of Time, etc.)

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SNES audio emulation is pretty damn accurate as it is with any plugins that use Blargg's libraries. The DAC of the SNES is pretty poor; I have a feeling anything recorded from a real SNES would simply sound more muffled in comparison, being the only difference. If you're going to record such though, make sure your SNES is NOT one of the later revisions (where they got rid of the separate audio board and condensed the CPU/audio/video/etc. in to one chip called the 1CHIP; avoid this for audio, but for video it's sharper than the first revisions).

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Shugo Takahashi and Iron Goat also started recording Game Boy soundtracks from a DMG-01 Game Boy, which has the best sound over other models. Way superior to emulation; much improved bass and doesn't have a harsh edge to it like emulated playback does; sounds awesome. Plus some songs with emulation that I've heard personally are just plain NOT how it sounds with the real hardware; eg. some background lead sounds like an entirely different 'instrument' persay, so recording that is totally worth it.

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If anyone's going to be recording a new console, do the research necessary to do it right the first time versus correcting yourself along the way and having to redo recordings. Also see if there's a real benefit to recording the real console over emulation (like how it's worth it with model 1 Megadrive, which sounds superb), in regards on how to best utilize your time in terms of prioritizing.
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#9
Well, it's not like someone wakes up in the morning and decides to start a project like this Smile



It's not like doing a couple of google searches either. Before starting this project I started doing a lot of research and studying how analog signals are digitalized through modern ADCs.



It took more than a month to amass all the information I needed and another 2 months of trial and error to come up with something I was satisfied with.



As you can see we're still making progress by doing small mods to the original hardware and getting better and better recording equipment.



We still got a long way to go, that's why I'm reluctant about starting ripping another console's games.

I can say for sure that after the Mega Drive we're going for the SNES, but, when the time comes, it will be another long month of research before I'll actually feel comfortable ripping music from it.
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#10
I'd love to open up to SMS and NES, donluca. Smile



I can't make the box you sent me work though, its FireWire and designed for Mac. My Windows laptop won't recognise it even when I adapt from FireWire to USB. I have a replacement on its way, hopefully it'll be as good (can't be much worse than my line in).



I'll start researching the best SMS output. I have the SG1000 mkII, mkIII, sc-3000, SC-3000H and Master System I, alongside a Master System Converter for the Mega Drive. I'll look up the best one and go from there Smile



Also SG1000 games lol
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